VPR Café – VPR Archive http://vprarchive.vpr.net Mon, 29 Jan 2018 17:10:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 http://vprarchive.vpr.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/cropped-screenshot-32x32.png VPR Café – VPR Archive http://vprarchive.vpr.net 32 32 Selecting A CSA http://vprarchive.vpr.net/vpr-cafe/selecting-a-csa/ Sun, 14 Apr 2013 14:40:00 +0000 http://vprarchive.vpr.net/uncategorized/selecting-a-csa/

Is a CSA right for you?  Ric Cengeri and Candace Page share their experience and advice. 

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Is a CSA right for you?  How much food will you get?  Will you have time to cook it?  Will you know what to do with it?  Candace Page, who writes for the Burlington Free
Press, is a
two-time CSA divorcee. 
VPRs Ric Cengeri is an enthusiastic CSA devotee. 
Between them you’ll hear sound advice for selecting a CSA that works for you.

For information about CSAs in your area:

Vermont Department of Agriculture

Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont

CSA Matchmaker is a new CSA selection service for residents of the Champlain Valley.  It’s offered by Localsources.

The VPR Cafe is produced in collaboration with The Burlington Free Press.  Candy Page writes for the Savorevore Section where she shared these recipes for celeriac.  Also, see below for Candy’s list of questions to ask yourself in deciding if a CSA is for you and how to select one.

 

Celery Root and Potato Purée

(This is a version is by a Kansas City, Missouri chef who blogs at www.acookinglifeblog.blogspot.com)
Ingredients:
3 tablespoons butter
1 medium celery root-about 3/4 to 1 lb., peeled, halved and thinly sliced
Salt
Whole milk (about 1/2 to 2/3 cup), gently warmed until steaming hot
1 pound potatoes (Yukon Gold, Yellow Finn or Idaho Russets), peeled and cut into large chunks
2 tablespoons butter, room temperature
Directions:
In a wide, heavy-bottomed saucepan, melt three tablespoons of butter over medium-low heat. Add the celery root along with a pinch of salt and toss to coat the celery root in the butter.

Cover tightly and cook until quite soft, about 12 to 15 minutes, stirring now and then. Lower the heat if the celery root starts to brown. (Note: You may need to add a small amount of water to keep the root from sticking. In that case, once the celery root is soft, cooked uncovered briefly until the water evaporates).

Purée in the blender or food processor. The blender will give a more silky purée, but you will need to add milk as you blend.

While the celery root cooks, place the potatoes in a saucepan and cover with salted water. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat and cook at a gentle simmer until just tender. Drain. Pass through a ricer or food mill and return to the pot. Fold in 2 T. of butter and the reserved celery root purée.

Adjust the consistency of the purée with warm milk. Season to taste with salt & pepper. Serves 4.
(Tasting note: Alternatively, skip the potatoes and serve unadorned celery root puree. )

Localvore celeriac-potato gratin

(The big difference among recipes for this dish is whether or not to partially cook the vegetables on the stovetop before baking the gratin in the oven. The stovetop method is messier and creates more dishes, but does cut the oven cooking time substantially. If you choose to do the oven-only version, reduce the cream to 2-3 cups).

Ingredients:
2 celeriac roots, ¾ to 1 pound each
5 medium potatoes
4 cups liquid. Cream is best, but cut it a little or a lot with whole milk or chicken stock, depending on your tolerance for calories
1 cup shredded mild cheddar (Swiss is the traditional choice, but this is Vermont)
½ teaspoon dried thyme
3/4 cup thinly sliced shallots or leeks (optional)
Minced garlic to taste (optional)
Salt and pepper to taste
Butter
Directions
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
Peel and thinly slice the potatoes and celeriac. Put the cream and milk in a big pot, preferably non-stick for easier cleaning and add the potatoes and celeriac. Bring to a slow boil, then reduce to a simmer. Cook until the vegetables can be pierced by a fort but are not completely tender. Off the heat, stir in the shallots, garlic, thyme, salt and and garlic.

Pour the vegetables into a buttered gratin dish and top with the cheese. Bake 30 to 45 minutes.

What to ask before you choose a CSA:

Local Harvest, a national website that helps connect consumers and farmers, offers some advice to those seeking a farm share. Here are some of the questions they suggest asking and a few of my own as well:
Know thyself. Ask yourself these questions:
• Do I like to cook and does my schedule allow me to make homemade meals most evenings?
• Will it be fun to cook vegetables that are new to me?

How will I handle excess produce? (Do you have a neighbor who would
like to get some if you get “behind”?) Feeling bad about wasting food is
one of the top reasons former CSA members cite for not renewing.
• I’ll be paying for my food in advance. Am I willing to accept the unknowns involved in “shared risk”?
Talk to the farmer. Among the questions you might ask are these:
• How long have you been farming? Doing a CSA?
• How much choice is available in the weekly share?
• Do you deliver to my town or neighborhood, or do I pick up the food on the farm?
• Is there a choice of pickup times?
• What happens to my share if I cannot pick it up one week?
• Are there items in your box grown by other farms, and if so, which farms?
• How did last season go?
• How many members do you have?

What percentage of the food you deliver annually is grown on your farm?
If the answer is less than 100%, ask where the rest of the food comes
from, whether it’s certified organic (if that is important to you), and
whether members are told which items come from off-farm.
• I’d like to talk with a couple of your members before I commit. Could you give me contact info for a couple of “references?”

Support
for The VPR Café comes from The Vermont Community Foundation‘s food and farm
initiative, supporting farmers and helping all families access nutritious local
food

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Cooking Class Taste Test http://vprarchive.vpr.net/vpr-cafe/cooking-class-taste-test/ Sun, 07 Apr 2013 14:40:00 +0000 http://vprarchive.vpr.net/uncategorized/cooking-class-taste-test/ Sally Pollak talks with Ric Cengeri about cooking classes.

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Sally Pollak tested cooking classes in the region recently.  Today on the VPR Cafe, Sally talks about what she learned:  slicing, sauteing, making friends and the secret behind the perfect French Onion Soup.

Sally writes for the Savorevore Section of The Burlington Free Press, where you can learn more about the classes she took.  (And what kind of fun job is that?!)

Click here for the recipes for French onion soup, steak au poivre, truffle mashed potatoes and crème brûlée from The Essex.

Support for The VPR Cafe comes from The Vermont Community Foundation food and farm initiative.

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VPR Cafe: Niche Foods http://vprarchive.vpr.net/vpr-cafe/vpr-cafe-niche-foods/ Sun, 31 Mar 2013 14:40:00 +0000 http://vprarchive.vpr.net/uncategorized/vpr-cafe-niche-foods/ Sweet potatoes, home grown trout and unique maple products.

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Many
young farmers and food producers are finding new niches in the local,
sustainable food landscape.  Melissa
Pasanen, who writes for the Savorevore Series in the Burlington Free Press,
fills us in on super delicious sweet potatoes, trout farming in a grain silo
and maple crunchies.

The
VPR Café is produced in collaboration with The Burlington Free Press, where you
can read more about niche food endeavors.

Support for The VPR Café comes from The Vermont Community Foundation’s
food and farm initiative, supporting farmers and helping all families access
nutritious local food. VERMONT C-F DOT-ORG.

Here are Melissa’s stories about Justin Rich and the sweet potatoes at
Burnt Rock Farm
and Tonewood Maple.

Maple-Ginger Sweet Potato
Muffins

Ingredients:
1 ¾ cups white whole wheat flour (or all-purpose flour, or half regular whole wheat pastry flour and half all-purpose flour)
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
¾ teaspoon ground cinnamon
½ teaspoon ground ginger
¾ teaspoon fine salt
2 eggs
½ cup canola oil
½ maple syrup, preferably Grade B or Grade A dark amber
1/3 cup buttermilk (or 1/3 cup plain or vanilla yogurt, sour cream, or 1/3 cup milk with 1 teaspoon white vinegar stirred in)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
½ cup light brown sugar
1 cup cooked, mashed sweet potato
½ cup finely chopped crystallized ginger (optional)

Directions
Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with paper liners or grease well. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, ginger and salt. In a large bowl, whisk eggs and then whisk in oil, maple syrup, buttermilk, vanilla extract, brown sugar and sweet potato until blended. (Tip: if brown sugar is clumpy, rub it between your fingers as you add it to break up lumps.) Add flour mixture to wet ingredients and stir in just until well combined. Stir in crystallized ginger, if using. Scoop batter evenly into muffin cups. Reduce heat to 375 degrees and put muffins in the oven. Bake 19-21 minutes until domed and golden and a toothpick or cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool before eating. Makes 12 muffins.

~ recipe developed and tested by Melissa Pasanen, Free Press correspondent

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VPR Cafe: Lunch! http://vprarchive.vpr.net/vpr-cafe/vpr-cafe-lunch/ Sun, 24 Mar 2013 14:40:00 +0000 http://vprarchive.vpr.net/uncategorized/vpr-cafe-lunch/ Lunch at the General Store.

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The heart of many of Vermont’s towns and villages rests in their country stores. Patrons stop in for gas, a few groceries, and just as importantly – the latest news and lunch!

Ric Cengeri talks with Candace Page about the variety of menus you’ll find at country stores around Vermont as well as how these stores and their communities hold each other together.

The VPR Cafe is produced in collaboration with The Burlington Free Press. Candy writes for the Free Press Savorvore Series.

You can read more about The Franklin General Store and watch a video of Spring Perras in the kitchen.

Here are links to the general stores mentioned in the VPR Cafe:  

W.E. Pierce, North Shrewsbury

Morgan Country Store 

The Warren Store

Putney General Store

Barnard General Store

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Creating Community http://vprarchive.vpr.net/vpr-cafe/creating-community/ Sun, 17 Mar 2013 14:40:00 +0000 http://vprarchive.vpr.net/uncategorized/creating-community/ This week, Sally Pollak talks with Ric Cengeri about the many ways that food is the catalyst for creating community.

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Theater among the vegetables, bacon at a sweet shop, and bread at a puppet show. This week on The VPR Cafe, Ric Cengeri talks with Sally Pollak about the unexpected combinations that are the catalyst for community. 

Drawing from her travels around Vermont, Sally shares stories about how eating gets people talking, singing, laughing and connecting.

The VPR Cafe is produced in collaboration with The Burlington Free Press.  Sally Pollak writes for the Free Press on a variety of issues including the Savorvore Series.

You can read more about and watch videos from Bacon Night at Nutty Steph’s in Middlesex and Fable Farm in Barnard.

 

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Baked Beans At The VPR Cafe http://vprarchive.vpr.net/vpr-cafe/baked-beans-at-the-vpr-cafe/ Sun, 10 Mar 2013 14:30:00 +0000 http://vprarchive.vpr.net/uncategorized/baked-beans-at-the-vpr-cafe/ This week on the VPR Cafe, Ric Cengeri talks with free lance writer Melissa Pasanen about the New England Tradition of baked beans - and how we bake them.

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This week on the VPR Cafe, Ric Cengeri talks with Melissa Pasanen about the New England Tradition of baked beans and – how we bake them.  They talk about beans grown here in Vermont and "The J Sisters" in Georgia.

The VPR Cafe is produced in collaboration with The Burlington Free
Press.  Melissa Pasanen is a free lance writer for several publications including the Burlington Free Press Savorvore Series

A Vermont mecca for baked beans is the Brownsville Baked Bean Supper.  VPR’s Steve Zind filed this story a few years back.  You’ll find the three baked bean recipes (for a crowd) from the Brownsville cookbook below, thanks to Genevieve Lemire.  Genevieve says you can buy copies of the cookbook at the West Windsor Historical Society Grange Hall in Brownsville.

To soak the beans, or not to soak…. salt pork or vegetarian? What about onions, molasses and ketchup?  Baked bean aficionados are passionate about their recipes, and usually pretty secretive.  But we managed to procure these for you and would love to share yours as well

Ruth Page was a VPR Commentator for many years.  Her daughter, Candace Page, published her mom’s recipe in The Burlington Free Press in 2010:

Ruth Page’s Baked Beans
INGREDIENTS
2 cups yellow-eye or pea beans
1 ham bone or meaty ham hock
1/2 cup ketchup
1/2 cup dark molasses
1 teaspoon yellow mustard
DIRECTIONS
1. Soak beans overnight in water to cover. Drain the beans and put them in a large pot, cover with water, bring to a boil and simmer on the stovetop for at least 30 minutes.
2. Put the ham bone in a beanpot (or other casserole) with a tight-fitting lid. Add the beans and their cooking liquid, and the remaining ingredients.
3. Cook in a 250-300-degree oven for six to eight hours. Check occasionally and add more water if the beans seem dry. Taste during the last hour. Add small amounts of ketchup (for more acid) or molasses (for more sweetness) as necessary.

Ginger Isham’s Maple Barbecue Baked Beans
For more maple recipes from Ginger Isham, check out last week’s VPR Cafe.
INGREDIENTS
5 cans beans, drained, a combination of kidney, pinto, great Northern and lima beans ("I use shell beans for one of these sometimes," Isham says).
½ cup chopped onion
¼ cup Worcestershire sauce
¼ cup regular mustard
1 tablespoon chili powder
½ teaspoon of ginger, or more, to taste
¾ cup dark maple syrup (Grade B or C)
8 ounces bottled spicy barbecue sauce
Mix all together and cook in oven for one hour at 350 degrees, or in a crockpot on low for three to four hours.
Adapted from a recipe given to Ginger Isham by a friend, Jeanne Johnson.

Brownsville Baked Bean Supper Red Kidney Bean Recipe
INGREDIENTS
3 Quarts dry kidney beans (5 1/2 pounds)
2 cups sugar
3 teaspoons dry mustard, rounded
1/2 cup molasses
Salt pork (1/2 to 3/4 pound)
1/2 teaspoon pepper
5 teaspoons salt
2 medium onions
DIRECTIONS
Soak beans overnight in a large kettle. Drain, cover with water, and bring to a simmer. Simmer until the beans indent when pinched between your fingers. Remove from heat and drain. Add all other ingredients, cover with water and bake in a 400 degree oven for one hour. Reduce oven temperature to 325 and bake for 5 to 6 hours. Keep checking every hour to make sure beans are kept covered with water and aren’t overcooked.

Brownsville Baked Bean Supper Yellow Eye Recipe
INGREDIENTS
4 pounds dry yellow eye beans
2 cups white sugar
2 cups maple syrup
Salt pork (1/2 pound)
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons dry mustard
2 sliced onions
DIRECTIONS
Soak beans in water overnight.  Parboil, then drain and rinse with cold water.  Add all other ingredients and enough water to cover.  Bake at 325 degrees for 6 hours.  Add water occasionally to beans while baking.

Brownsville Baked Bean Supper Pea Beans Recipe

8 pounds dry pea beans
Salt pork (1 1/2 pounds cut in pieces)
2 pounds brown sugar or 2 cups maple syrup
2 cups white sugar
1 1/2 cups molasses
4 teaspoons dry mustard
2 teaspoons ginger
5 tablespoons salt
3 large onions
DIRECTIONS
Soak beans in water overnight. Change water and parboil until skins crack. Drain, rinse, and add other ingredients. Cover beans with water and bake for about 5 hours at 300 degrees. Add more water as needed to keep the beans covered as they bake.

Mrs. Appleyard’s Vermont Baked Beans*
INGREDIENTS
4 cups yellow-eye beans
1 pound salt pork
2 small onions
1 teaspoon mustard
1/4 cup maple syrup
DIRECTIONS
Soak the beans overnight. In the morning drain them, cover them with cold water and heat them slowly. Keep the water below the boiling point and cook the beans until the skin cracks when you take some out on a spoon and blow on them. This should happen in about 40 minutes.
Drain the beans, saving the water. Cut a thin slice off the pork and put it in the bottom of the bean pot. Put the onions in whole. They will vanish during the cooking and their flavor will be only a memory. Mix the mustard and maple syrup — or brown sugar if you have no syrup on hand — with a cup of boiling water. Put some beans on top of the onions. Make several gashes about an inch deep in the rind of the salt pork. Put it in to the bean pot. Surround it with the rest of the beans, letting the rind show on top. Then pour over the water with the seasonings dissolved in it and add enough more water to cover the beans.
Put the lid on the bean pot and set it in a slow oven, 300 degrees, for eight hours. Add a little water occasionally. After 7 hours, uncover the beans so the rind of the pork will get brown and crisp.
Mrs. Appleyard usually serves some of her own apple-mint chutney with the beans and also some Boston brown bread."
*From The Vermont Year-Round Cookbook, Houghton Mifflin Co., 1965

 

 

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Maple By Any Other Name? http://vprarchive.vpr.net/vpr-cafe/maple-by-any-other-name/ Sun, 03 Mar 2013 15:40:00 +0000 http://vprarchive.vpr.net/uncategorized/maple-by-any-other-name/ Maple Sugaring season is fast approaching. On this first episode of the VPR Cafe, Ric talks with Candy Page about what the new international maple grading system means for producers and consumers. She also brings us into Ginger Isham's kitchen in Williston where maple is king.

 

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Maple Sugaring season is fast approaching.  On this first episode of the
VPR Cafe, Ric talks with Candace Page about what the new international
maple grading system means for producers and consumers.  She also brings
us into Ginger Isham’s kitchen in Williston where maple is king.

By the way, Vermont Maple Sugar Makers Open House Weekend is coming up March 23rd and 24th.

The VPR Cafe is produced in collaboration with The Burlington Free Press.  Candace Page has spent more than 30 years at the Free Press covering all angles of Vermont politics, government, and lifestyle. 

Learn more about The VPR Cafe in our blog.

 

Ginger Isham’s Maple Barbecue Baked Beans

5 cans beans, drained, a combination of kidney, pinto, great Northern and lima beans ("I use shell beans for one of these sometimes," Isham says).
½ cup chopped onion
¼ cup Worcestershire sauce
¼ cup regular mustard
1 tablespoon chili powder
½ teaspoon of ginger, or more, to taste
¾ cup dark maple syrup (Grade B or C)
8 ounces bottled spicy barbecue sauce
Mix all together and cook in oven for one hour at 350 degrees, or in a crockpot on low for three to four hours.
Adapted from a recipe given to Ginger Isham by a friend, Jeanne Johnson.

Ginger Isham’s Maple Syrup Pudding

Mix together:
1 c. flour
1/2 tsp. salt
1 1/2 tsp. baking powder
1/4 c. dark brown sugar
1/2 c. milk
1 tsp. vanilla
1/4 c. melted butter

Place batter in 1-quart casserole. Sprinkle with raisins or chopped nuts. In a saucepan, bring 3/4 c. maple syrup (dark amber or Grade B) and 1/3 c. water to a boil. Pour this over the batter and bake in 350 degree oven for 35-40 minutes. Serve warm with light cream.

 

Special Vermont Maple Barbecue Marinade
Recipe from Lee Light, Hollister Hill Farm, Marshfield, Vermont.

2 lbs. spareribs or chicken
1/2 c. Vermont maple syrup (the darker, the better)
1/2 c. cider vinegar
1/3 c. soy sauce (I like Tamari soy sauce)
2 tsp. of cinnamon
2-3 cloves of finely chopped garlic

For ribs, par-boil for 30-45 minutes or until fork tender. Chicken does not need to be precooked. Mix remaining ingredients together for marinade. Marinate the meat for at least 2-3 hours, turning frequently. Grill until well browned on all sides. Enjoy!

  

 

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